Geological Engineers

(NOC 2144)
 

What do Geological Engineers do?

Geological engineers conduct geological/geotechnical studies to assess the suitability of locations for civil engineering, mining, and oil/gas projects.

How to become: Geological Engineers

In general, you need a university degree in your chosen field of engineering.

You may also need a master's degree or doctorate in a related engineering field.

You need a licence from a provincial/territorial association of professional engineers to approve engineering drawings/reports and to practise as a professional engineer (P. Eng.).

As an engineer, you are eligible for registration following graduation from an accredited educational program, after three or four years of supervised work experience in engineering, and after passing a professional practice examination.

With experience, you can move up the ranks to become a supervisor.

Most recent entrants have an undergraduate university degree, and almost 3 in 20 have a graduate degree.

Geological engineers work closely with geologists and other scientists and engineers, and mobility is possible between some fields of specialization.

Where to study for a career as: Geological Engineers

University of Waterloo
Waterloo, Ontario, CA

Related Program(s):
Geological Engineering Bachelor; Co-op; Honours
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University of New Brunswick - Saint John
Saint John, New Brunswick, CA

Related Program(s):
Geological Engineering Bachelor; University Transfer
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University of New Brunswick - Fredericton
Fredericton, New Brunswick, CA

Related Program(s):
Geological Engineering Bachelor
Geological Engineering Bachelor; Co-op
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York University
Toronto, Ontario, CA

Related Program(s):
Geomatics Engineering Bachelor; Honours
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Modified on January 26, 2022

How much do Geological Engineers make?

Low:
$56,638
Average:
$95,326
High:
$194,584

Job openings for Geological Engineers

Job Seekers:
10,200
Job Openings:
5,100